Myopia Control

Myopia, or 'short-sightedness', causes people to have difficulty seeing distant objects clearly. The incidence of this eye condition is increasing worldwide, thought to be due to modern lifestyles, increased exposure to near work tasks and screens and reduced exposure to sunlight. It is now estimated that half the world’s population will be myopic by 2050. The onset of myopia at an early age brings with it the likelihood of life-long eye care. Higher levels of myopia result in a significantly increased risk of serious ocular health problems, such as glaucoma and retinal detachments, which can lead to vision loss and blindness. The risks of developing these conditions increases with the increase in myopia. Click          for World Health Organisation report.

There is, as yet, no cure for myopia. The physical change of the elongated eyeball cannot be reversed (not even with laser-eye surgery). The aim of Myopia Control is to slow down, or halt, the progression of myopia. This is becoming increasingly effective, especially in children and teenagers.

Current research has shown effective myopia control with the use of specialist contact lenses.

Orthokeratology lenses are playing a key role in Myopia Control all over the world. Recent studies have indicated that myopia develops at a much slower rate, and can even be halted in children fitted with ortho-k. The results vary for each individual child, but most experts maintain that these lenses are the best option available for children suffering from myopia.

Designs in specialist soft daily disposable lenses have recently become available and have also shown very promising results.